BARK THINS FINDS ITS BITE


The ASK

Give Bark Thins a bold new voice.

Point of Tension

Not all indulgences go hand in hand with regret. Some leave us feeling fortified.

The Idea

Make regret the enemy. Celebrate the snackers who openly embrace their indulgence.


Methodology

1 x 1 interviews, store visit, desk research, shared truths, social media audit, brand positioning


Background

With healthy, wholesome, and certified ingredients (fair trade, non-GMO, kosher), Bark Thins promises an elevated chocolate snack experience. Owned by Hershey, the gourmet confectioner’s chocolate “shards” come in 9 flavor combinations with seasonal varieties.

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Audience

Bark Thins is for the sweet-toothed snacker with a discriminating palate. They’re looking for something more refined than the generic candy experience, something that pairs well with a glass of wine in front of Netflix.


Insight

There are two types of indulgences: those that leave us refreshed, and those that leave us with lingering regret. It’s the difference between a honey oatmeal face mask and a tub of raw cookie dough.


Opportunity

Be the face mask in a raw cookie dough world.

 
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Manifesto for Unapologetic Snackers

It’s 3pm and the client meeting that was supposed to end an hour ago is still ongoing.

But we’re not worried. We came prepared.

We are the unapologetic snackers.

We stand for leaving the bag open... because you can’t have just one piece.

We stand for just a few more minutes of “me time”

We stand for the triumphant encore after the sad desk lunch.

We stand for celebrating the small victories-- like making it through yet another conference call.

So let’s hear it for the elevated sweet treat, more wholesome than the vending machine.

For the perfect union of salty and sweet, once and for all.

For indulgences you flaunt instead of hide.

Some snacks are made for sharing. This one’s just for you.

Embrace your indulgence with Bark Thins.

 

Partner in Snacking: Cara Coffin

Trivia: Dating back to 2000 BC, the Maya from Central America first drank chocolate as a bitter fermented beverage mixed with spices or wine.